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Flood bug

The Flood bug is a slater that is endemic to Australia and a minor pest of cereals at establishment. Contrary to common belief, slaters are crustaceans, not insects. They have a hard skeleton on the outside of their bodies and many pairs of jointed legs. Adult Flood bugs are approximately 7-9 mm long and 4-6 mm wide. They are oval shaped and have a flattened body, with light coloured legs. The body is light brown in colour, with a dark brown head markings down the middle.

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Flood bugs

... completely bare. The affected paddock has dark cracking soils and the majority of damage appears to be concentrated in the driest parts. Other paddocks have also experienced some feeding damage. Although not confirmed, these slaters are likely to be the Flood bug (Australiodillo bifrons). In the past, the Flood bug has caused significant damage to cereal crops around Moree and Mudgee in northern New South Wales. The Flood bug is a native species, approximately 7-8 mm in length and 4 mm wide. T...

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Slaters

District agronomist, Tim Burley (NSW DPI), has observed high numbers of slaters in a wheat crop near Moree, in the North West Slopes and Plains district of New South Wales. Although not confirmed, they are likely to be Flood bugs (Australiodillo bifrons), which are a native species that has previously caused problems in this region. The affected paddock has been sown into faba bean stubble, and Tim says some damage is already evident on emerging seedlings, which are currently at the 2-leaf stage...

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Slaters

... soon be sown to canola and it is unclear whether any feeding damage to emerging seedlings is likely to occur. In the past two years, there have been some isolated cases where slaters have caused economic damage to broad-acre crops. In particular, the ‘Flood bug’ (Australiodillo bifrons), has caused extensive damage to cereal crops around Moree in northern New South Wales. The Flood bug is a native species, approximately 7-8mm long and 4mm wide. They are oval shaped and have a flattened body...

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Slaters

... plants in the south of Western Australia. Problems appear to have occurred in paddocks containing a large amount of stubble. Peter says crumbly clay soil surfaces and cracking clays seem to favour the survival of slaters. One particular species, the ‘Flood bug’ (Australiodillo bifrons), has caused significant damage to cereal crops around Moree and Mudgee in northern New South Wales. The Flood bug is a native species, approximately 7-8 mm in length and 4 mm wide. They are oval shaped and ha...

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Slaters

... damage to emerging canola seedlings, which are still at the cotyledon stage. The paddock will continue to be monitored closely. Slaters will occasionally attack broad-acre crops, and in some instances can cause serious damage. One particular species, the Flood bug, is known to be a significant pest in isolated areas of northern New South Wales, and was recently reported attacking canola. Feeding by slaters results in uneven rasping-type damage that can appear as ‘windows’ of transparent lea...

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Slaters

... survival of slaters. Slaters have a hard skeleton on the outside of their bodies and many pairs of jointed legs. Slater damage is often in the form of uneven rasping that can appear as ‘windows’ of transparent leaf membrane. One particular species, the Flood bug (Australiodillo bifrons), is known to be a significant pest of cereal crops in northern New South Wales. The slater species observed by Ben is not the Flood bug, but is a species that may be more closely related to the commonly foun...

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Slaters

... surfaces and cracking clays also seem to favour the survival of slaters. Contrary to common belief, slaters are crustaceans, not insects. They have a hard skeleton on the outside of their bodies and many pairs of jointed legs. One particular species, the Flood bug (Australiodillo bifrons), is known to be a significant pest of cereal crops in northern New South Wales. Slater damage is often in the form of uneven rasping that can appear as ‘windows’ of transparent leaf membrane. The slater sp...

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Slaters

District agronomist, Rohan Brill (NSW DPI), has reported slaters attacking a canola crop near Coonamble, in the Central West Slopes and Plains district of New South Wales. The slaters have been identified as the Flood bug (Australiodillo bifrons). The Flood bug is a native species, approximately 7-8 mm in length and 4 mm wide. They are oval shaped and have a flattened body, with light coloured legs. They have the unusual behaviour of moving in ‘swarms’ which can consist of >100,000 indivi...

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Slaters

... Porcellio scaber, is the most widespread species in Australia. The Pill bug, Armadillidium vulgare, is also a European species and occurs commonly across Australia. This species is characterised by it’s ability to roll into a ball when disturbed. The Flood bug, Australiodillo bifrons, is a native slater that forms large swarms of tens of thousands of individuals. There have been increasing numbers of reports of the Flood bug in parts of NSW, particularly in areas prone to Flooding. For detail...

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